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Archive for July, 2011

“C’est Cidre. Not Cider” :-)

A really quick post this evening, and unlike most of my articles of late something on the lighter side… Yes, it’s the latest commercial for Stella Artois‘ new ‘cidre’ (not ‘cider’):

Love it!

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If you were king… (would you do any better?)

Via Davy at The UK Libertarian blog, I came across this great video which, quite simply and elegantly, pulls apart the concept that the State (whether it takes the form of a benevolent king or, for example, the US Congress) can ever be a positive force for humanity in general. Check it out – it will make you think!

Of course, one only has to look at what is currently going on in Europe, the US and a multitude of other places around the world to realise quite quickly that our rulers are anything but benevolent…

When did you sign the ‘social’ contract…?

There’s a great article posted on the Mises Institute blog that I highly recommend, on the topic of the so-called ‘social contract’:

In regard to the so-called social contract, I have often had occasion to protest that I haven’t even seen the contract, much less been asked to consent to it. A valid contract requires voluntary offer, acceptance, and consideration. I’ve never received an offer from my rulers, so I certainly have not accepted one; and rather than consideration, I have received nothing but contempt from the rulers, who, notwithstanding the absence of any agreement, have indubitably threatened me with grave harm in the event that I fail to comply with their edicts.

What monumental effrontery these people exhibit! What gives them the right to rob me and push me around? It certainly is not my desire to be a sheep for them to shear or slaughter as they deem expedient for the attainment of their own ends.

Moreover, when we flesh out the idea of “consent of the governed” in realistic detail, the whole notion quickly becomes utterly preposterous.

The author, Robert Higgs, then goes on – in a way that would be hilarious if it was not so true – what this social contract would look like if you were to receive it in the post tomorrow:

I, the party of the first part (“the ruler”), promise:

(1) To stipulate how much of your money you will hand over to me, as well as how, when, and where the transfer will be made. You will have no effective say in the matter, aside from pleading for my mercy, and if you should fail to comply, my agents will punish you with fines, imprisonment, and (in the event of your persistent resistance) death.

(2) To make thousands upon thousands of rules for you to obey without question, again on pain of punishment by my agents. You will have no effective say in determining the content of these rules, which will be so numerous, complex, and in many cases beyond comprehension that no human being could conceivably know about more than a handful of them, much less their specific character; yet if you should fail to comply with any of them, I will feel free to punish you to the extent of a law made by me and my confederates.

(3) To provide for your use, on terms stipulated by me and my agents, so-called public goods and services. Although you may actually place some value on a few of these goods and services, most will have little or no value to you, and some you will find utterly abhorrent, and in no event will you as an individual have any effective say over the goods and services I provide, notwithstanding any economist’s cock-and-bull story to the effect that you “demand” all this stuff and value it at whatever amount of money I choose to expend for its provision.

(4) In the event of a dispute between us, judges beholden to me for their appointment and salaries will decide how to settle the dispute. You can expect to lose in these settlements, if your case is heard at all.

In exchange for the foregoing government “benefits,” you, the party of the second part (“the subject”), promise:

(5) To shut up, make no waves, obey all orders issued by the ruler and his agents, kowtow to them as if they were important, honorable people, and when they say “jump,” ask only “how high?”

Would you sign up to this…?

Why can’t the NHS be run like Tesco?

Came across an excellent post from the Adam Smith Institute the other day that’s definitely worth sharing:

We’re lucky there’s no such thing as the National Food Service [NFS], modelled on the National Health Service, to ensure equal access to affordable food supplies.

[…] It’s not hard to imagine the disaster befalling our kitchens and restaurants if the industry was organised into an NFS in pursuit of an equality agenda. GPs (Grocery Practitioners) would be the gatekeepers to food supplies, assessing everyone’s basic dietary requirements and issuing coupons according to guidelines from Whitehall under budgets set by the Treasury. PCTs (Primary Comestible Trusts) would oversee the distribution of food parcels, adopting best practices as judged by NICE (National Institute for Cuisine Excellence). There’d be nationally set waiting-list targets to see consultants on wine and cheese.

Fortunately, nobody is seriously proposing a National Food Service – yet. But, equally, nobody is seeking lessons from the supermarkets on delivering efficient health care in rapid response to changing consumer demands. Which is too bad.

I think this article makes its central point very clearly: that there is absolutely no credible reason why the NHS needs to be organised the way it is, i.e. through central government dictat and controlled by all-powerful vested interests. The equally important grocery industry is as near to free-market capitalism as you can get in this country, and yet somehow the less well off have plenty of options on where to shop and have not starved en masse.

The time for a free-market health service that truly reflects the needs of the customer – not the producers – is now. Will anyone do anything to bring this about before the current system collapses under its ever-increasing burden…?

I’m not holding my breath…